AD's English Literature : October 2013

Thursday, October 31, 2013

A TO Z Literary Principles from History of English Literature: Note -66



A Set of 26 Objective Questions & Answers
UGC NET ENGLISH QUESTION BANK

  Elizabethan Age  / Renaissance  (Reworking of learning)         
  1. Elizabethan ascended the throne of England in 1558 and ruled over the country till her death in 1603. Read More about Elizabethan Literature 
  2. During this period, the English national life took big strides. Recognizing the Elizabethan period as one of the most signified periods, in the literary and social history of England, Hudson has observed, “By Virtue of its wonderful fertility and car city, and splendor of its production, this period ranks as one of the greatest in the annals of word’s literature, and its greatness was the result of many operative forces.” Read More about A to Z (Objective Questions)
  3. The renaissance reached its full flowering during this period. Under the impact of renaissance Elizabethan people freed themselves from the church. They adopted a flexible secular code in their life and thought.Read More about Elizabethan Literature 
  4. A new cutler of humanism was born people began to take interest in this life and made efforts to make it better and happiness.

Sunday, October 13, 2013

PRE-ELIZABETHAN PERIOD: Noted for the Extensive Manuring for the Fruitful Soil of the Elizabethan Literature


(Sir Thomas More, William Tyndale, Sir Thomas Wyatt, Nicholas Udall, Thomas Sackville, Thomas Norton)

Extending from 1500 to 1558, this period is noted for the extensive manuring for the fruitful soil of the Elizabethan Literature.  The fifteenth century produced but one book that is read nowadays, the Morte d’Arthur; up to the birth of Shakespeare in 1564, the sixteenth century produced but one, the Utopia. Sir Thomas More was one of the young men who were fortunate enough to study under the greatest of that remarkable group of scholars who, in the closing years of the fifteenth century, made Oxford famous by their teaching of Latin and Greek. Read More about History of English Literature (Essay)  He too became a great scholar, early gained prominence as a lawyer, and was eventually made Lord Chancellor; finally, because he adhered courageously to high moral principles, he gave up his life at the executioner's block, a very common ending to a life-story in those days. The Utopia, a small volume compared to the bulky Morte d’Arthur, is a great statesman-philosopher's dream of what he thought England should be. It tells of an ideal commonwealth on an imaginary island vaguely located somewhere between the coasts of South America and Africa. The account is supposed to come from a traveler who has been there and who tells in detail how the country is governed and what are the customs of the inhabitants. Some of More's ideas are so impracticable that Utopian has come to mean visionary; yet not a few of his reforms have long. Since been carried out, and others of them begin to look less strange. 

A TO Z Literary Principles from History of English Literature: Note 65


History of English Literature: A Set of 26 Objective Questions & Answers :

The Pre-Raphaelite movement

  • he   little group with Dante Rossetti, William Morris, and Algernon Swinburne, known as the Pre-Raphaelites,   found their inspiration, as did earlier poets who shared in the Romantic Movement, in the Middle Ages.
    • The Pre-Raphaelite movement, which was initiated by Dante Gabriel Rossetti in the mid nineteenth century, was originally not a literary but an artistic movement. Rossetti , himself a painter  and a poet as well felt that contemporary painting had become a too formal academic and unrealistic . Also read the other set of A to Z (Objective Questions)
  •  He desired to see it taken back to the realism, sensuousness and devotion to detail which characterize the art of the Italian painters before Raphael. 
  • They reacted against Victorian materialism and the neoclassical conventions of academic art by producing earnest, quasi-religious works.

Monday, October 7, 2013

A TO Z Literary Principles from History of English Literature: Note 64



A Set of 26 Objective Questions & Answers
UGC NET ENGLISH QUESTION BANK

(ALL THE ANSWERS ARE COLOURED. I HAVE TRIED TO GIVE LOGIC BEHIND ANSWERING THESE QUESTIONS. WITHOUT SYLLOGISTIC FORMAT YOU NEED AN ELFIN TOWER TALL HEAD.)  

1. Which of Dickens’ novels opens with the words “It was the best of times, it was the
worst of times ....”. Read More about A to Z (Objective Questions)
(A) A Tale of Two Cities (B) Oliver Twist
(C) Pickwick Papers (D) Hard Times
** “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way.”- A Tale of Two Cities**
2. The term “The Fleshly School of Poetry” is associated with the :
Read More about UGC NET
(A) Chartists (B) Pre-Raphaelites
(C) Symbolists (D) Imagists

Friday, October 4, 2013

A TO Z Literary Principles from History of English Literature: Note 63



A Set of 26 Objective Questions & Answers
UGC NET ENGLISH QUESTION BANK

 (ALL THE ANSWERS ARE COLOURED. I HAVE TRIED TO GIVE LOGIC BEHIND ANSWERING THESE QUESTIONS. WITHOUT SYLLOGISTIC FORMAT YOU NEED AN ELFIN TOWER TALL HEAD.)
1. The title The Sound and the Fury is taken from:
(A) Hamlet (B) Macbeth
(C) The Tempest (D) King Lear Read More about A to Z (Objective Questions)
** MACBETH :She should have died hereafter;
There would have been a time for such a word.
To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more: it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing. Act V, Sc V
**
2. Pecola is a character in:
(A) The Bluest Eye (B) Oliver Twist
(C) Don Quixote (D) Beloved
3. Which of the following was associated with the “Bloomsbury Group”.
(A) T. S. Eliot (B) W. B. Yeats
(C) T. E. Hulme (D) Virginia Woolf

A TO Z Literary Principles from History of English Literature: Note 60



A Set of 26 Objective Questions & Answers
UGC NET ENGLISH QUESTION BANK


1. The epithet “a comic epic in prose” is best applied to

(A) Richardson’s Pamela

(B) Sterne’s A Sentimental Journey

(C) Fielding’s Tom Jones

(D) Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe

**Several novels   fall into the category of mock epic, including Joseph Andrews (1742), described by its author, the English novelist Henry Fielding, as “a comic epic ... in prose.” However, his The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling (1749) or Tom Jones, is regarded by critics as one of the great English novels. It is in the picaresque tradition, involving the adventures and misadventures of a roguish hero. It tells in rich, realistic detail the many adventures that befall Tom, an engaging young libertine, in his efforts to gain his rightful inheritance. So the best choice is (c)** Read More about A to Z (Objective Questions)
 

2. Muriel Spark has written a dystopian novel called

(A) Memento Mori

(B) The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie

(C) Robinson

(D) The Ballad of Peckham Rye

** Memento Mori (1959)-a group of aged intellectuals carry on their bickering and rivalries even as they are successively dying, each one warned by a mysterious phone call, “Remember you must die.”

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1961)-the story of an eccentric Edinburgh schoolteacher seen through the eyes of an admiring (but later disenchanted) pupil.  **

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Philip Henslowe’s Diary and the Rose Theatre: Invaluable Material Evidence for the Study of the English Theatre in the age of Playwright William Shakespeare



Reading through the diary pages we learn, Philip Henslowe, son of Edmund Henslowe of Sussex was an enterprising man who was permanently settled on the bank side by 1577 and who married his master’s rich widow who had a fair daughter by her first marriage named Joan. In the eighties of the sixteenth century Henslowe is known as a dyer, in the nineties as a pawn-broker and always as a purchaser of southward property. As a businessman of enterprise, Henslowe of quick to mark the prospects of the theatre business; in 1585 he built the Rose Theater. Read More about William Shakespeare By 1594 he possessed another theatre at Newington butts. His step –daughter Joan was married to the famous actor, Edward Alleyn and this marked the beginning of a successful and profitable partnership with the great actor. By the time Henslowe the English theater manager owned the Fortune  and Hope  theaters in London. Read More about Drama  
 

To record first and most interestingly, Philip Henslowe took a lease of property called ‘the little rose with two gardens’ in 1585. It was situated on the backsides between the river and Maid Lane. The lease was to run for twenty years on a rental of £ 7. Later in 1587, the said Henslowe formed a partnership with one John Cholmley for building a playhouse on a portion of this property. It was built by 1588 and appears in Norden’s map of 1593 as a round building. Cholmley died in 1592. 

Recommendations

About Me

My photo

An English Teacher;    M. A.(English) , D. Ed., B. Ed., UGC- NET Qualified

"Dear Readers/ Students, I am a huge fan of books, English Grammar & Literature. I write this blog to instill that passion in you along with the usual strong will  of  earning some money  through  selling ad space. I also feel proud to be in 'free' literature learning initiative because it will be more  easy to get and find you out there . Already thousand posts written and a few thousand healthy discussions made in this blog. And if  you want to contribute in writing or support in money,  you're welcome." 

You Can  Also Buy My Articles @ Teachers Pay Teachers