AD's English Literature : Jim Corbett’s 'Life at Mokameh Ghat' in 'My India': Splendid Story that Reinforces the Notion that People must Learn to Live together in Harmony

Jim Corbett’s 'Life at Mokameh Ghat' in 'My India': Splendid Story that Reinforces the Notion that People must Learn to Live together in Harmony



Jim Corbett’s My India is a splendid story that reinforces the notion that people must learn to live together in harmony were actually the seed of communal discomfort at pre independence is fermenting. here is well documented and Written at the British India when the peoples of the India looked forward to a time of freedom fight through Gandhian peace and prosperity, the story of the coming of the new railroads to live among the Indian populace  symbolizes the optimism of these years. Jim Corbett does not, however, allow the development of his theme to rest on sentimentality and false hope. In fact, Jim Corbett become a trans-shipment Inspector for the Bengal and Northwestern Railway where he spent 21 years, working with hundreds of simple, loyal and hardworking labourers. Most of the stories in My India revolve around this period he spent in Mokameh Ghat. The book includes twelve dashing description of Jim’s motherland and Life at Mokameh Ghat is his 12th or the last piece of the book. Will will now reflect after Jim Corbett his days at Mokameh Ghat.

Mokameh Ghat is situated on the south bank of the Ganges, about ninety KM away from Patna in Bihar. At Mokameh Ghat Corbett handled million tons of goods and reached them to Samaria Ghat. At the very beginning the work was very oil some for the author and his men. The phrase means got accustomed or habituated with the work. The common object of the author and his men was to provide better service to those dependent on them. One of the author’s first undertakings was to start a school for the sons of his workmen and lower paid railway staff. Ram Saran was the station master of Mokameh Ghat station and a keen educationist. Caste prejudices were the first sang they ram up against. The school started with a membership of twenty boys. The title ‘Rai Sahib’ was conferred on Ram Saran by the government for his contribution to the school. Ram Saran and his band of willing helpers decorated the office and it surroundings with red and green signal flags and also with the strings of marigold and jasmine flowers. The real business of the day was the distribution of cash bonus the Ram Saran to the staffs and to the laborers. 

The author Jim Corbett was responsible for the running of the steamers at Mokameh Ghat. Jim Corbett’s hobby was to study the mankind. Crosthwaite was a young man from England who had come to Indian to serve in the railway was Jim's companion . The crossing of the Ganges gave him enough opportunity to come in contact with the large number of people who used the crossing to cross the river. The journey was between Mokameh Ghat and Samaria Ghat, just opposite to the Mokameh Ghat .The three Brahmins were carrying the water of the Ganges in their copper vessels. A dhunia is a person who cleans fluffs the old cotton with harp like instrument. There are two Tibetan lamas. The four pilgrims will sell the Ganges water drop by drop in their own and neighboring villages for the religious ceremonies. The man was a Mohammedan gentleman who was traveling from Gaya to Muzaffarpur. The Mohammedan gentleman deals in tobacco. Christmas was the only festival which was observed at Mokameh Ghat .

Corbett and his workers had to handle million tons goods at Mokameh Ghat. This works was very toil some at the very beginning. Later, they become habituated with the passage of time. At Mokameh Ghat Corbett handled million tons of goods and kept the traffic always moving. His workers were very cooperative and commuted. Thus, they earned a great reputation which was the result of combined efforts. The three Brahmins at the lower deck are the servants of a well-known maharaja in their big copper vessels. They are carrying Ganges water, drawn from the right bank from the personal use of Maharaja. On Christmas day Ram Saran and his willing helpers had given the office and its surroundings a colorful festival appearance by decorating with red and green signal flags and also with the strings of Mari gold and jasmine. Here the day referred to the Christmas day and the business was the distribution of cash bonus to Ram Saran, to the staff and to the laborers. This was appreciated greatly. The contract of transshipping million tons of goods from Mokameh Ghat to Samaria Ghat was so carefully done by Corbett and his men that they earned a great reputation which was a result of combined efforts. All of them not only took pride in this reputation but also were determined to retain it. 

As Corbett describes to the third class passengers at the lower deck, there are three Brahmins, the servants of a well-known Maharaja. After them there was a Mohammedan dhunia. Next to him there are two Tibetan lamas, returning from pilgrimage. After them are a group of four men, also returning from a pilgrimage to Benares. The last man on the left was an old friend of Corbett. Christmas day was the only festival which was celebrated at Mokameh Ghat. On this occasion Ram Saran and his willing helpers decorated the office and its surrounding with red and green signal flags and strings of Marigold and jasmine, later Ram Saran garlanded the author and delivered a long speech, followed by a short one by the author. Finally sweets were distributed among the children and distribution of bonus also started. At the end of  Life at Mokameh Ghat  Corbett felts relived as he had not to face the wades spread labor unrest, strikes and communal disorders of today’s India. India is his time was totally different because, at that time the interest of one was the interest of all and the people irrespective their class and religion could live work and play together in perfect harmony. When Jim Corbett was describing the passengers on the lower deck a Mohammedan gentleman was sitting near to them and was listening the description of Corbett. Then Corbett told his friend that the gentleman was a hide merchant, going to Muzaffarpur from Gaya. Immediately the man replayed in perfect English which made Corbett blushed with embarrassment he told them that he was a tobacco merchant.

(Note: 
Jim Corbett in whose honour there is Corbett National Park is the writer of the book ‘My India’.
 Born in India to British parents, Corbett became an authority on wildlife conservation and played a leading part in campaigning for the park's establishment. In 1973 the park was the first designated reserve of Project Tiger, a nationwide campaign to save the tiger from extinction.
In fact, His family had been living in India for three generations. Corbett was born in Naini Tal on 25th July 1875. He had to quit the school at the age of 16 to look for a job in order to support his family. He found a job that led him to become a trans-shipment Inspector for the Bengal and Northwestern Railway where he spent 21 years, working with hundreds of simple, loyal and hardworking labourers. Most of the stories in ‘My India’ revolve around this period he spent in Mokameh Ghat. 
The book includes twelve dashing description of Jim’s motherland i The Queen of the Village, ii Kunwar Singh ,iii Mothi ,iv Pre-Red-Tape Days ,v The Law of the Jungles ,vi The Brothers ,vii Sultana: India's Robin Hood ,viii Loyalty ,ix Budhu ,x Lala jee ,xi Chamari ,xii Life at Mokameh Ghat )
Ref: Wikipedia

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